Essential Oils

Uses of Eucalyptus Oil

The tall Eucalyptus tree (Eucalyptus globulus), originally from Australia, grows almost everywhere and is widely known as the gum tree. Eucalyptus leaves are long, smoky green and have a powerful invigorating aroma. Ayurvedically, eucalyptus has a pungent taste, a heating energy and reduces Vata and Kapha while it increases Pitta  It’s main actions are diaphoretic (causes perspiration and increased elimination through the skin, decongestant and stimulant, meaning it increases internal heat, dispels internal chill and strengthen metabolism and circulation.

The essential oil is extracted by distillation of the leaves and its main chemical components are eucalyptol and alpha-terpineol. Due to its multiple qualities, it is widely used in diverse commercial products like mouthwash, rubs, ointments and beauty care products. Since eucalyptus has many medicinal properties and uses, it’s a great idea to have a bottle of pure and therapeutic grade eucalyptus essential oil at home to compliment your daily health care.

It is ideal to clear breathing pathways, open airways and promote vigor and vitality. Eucalyptus works as an expectorant and helps cleanse the body of toxins and harmful microorganisms that can make you feel sick. To help clear congested pathways, pour one or two drops of eucalyptus oil into your hands, place over nose and inhale deeply. This also promotes vitality and an invigorating feeling. You can also rub it on the chest for aiming to clear chest congestion. Diluting it with a carrier oil (coconut, olive, almond) minimizes possible skin sensitivity.

A study from NYU Medical School found that using eucalyptus was effective at treating Sinusitis. Patients experienced faster improvement when supplementing with eucalyptus oil for allergies and sinus issues. The study had participants take eucalyptus oil internal, and it was also recommended to gargle with it to clear the throat. 

The strong antiseptic qualities in eucalyptus makes it ideal to support in the healing process of cuts and wounds. Take advantage of its germicidal properties by diluting it in water as a daily mouthwash to compliment your everyday mouth care and help prevent plaque, gum disease and cavities. When experiencing muscle and joint pain, a massage with eucalyptus oil, diluted with other carrier oils such as sesame, coconut or olive, can provide relief and lessen the pain due to its analgesic and anti-inflammatory qualities.

A few drops of eucalyptus oil with coconut or olive oil gives your hair a nice moisturizing pick me up. This is especially great to ward off dandruff and an itchy scalp. Also, eucalyptus is used as a natural remedy for lice in replacement of chemical treatments. 

It also can be used in a daily home cleanser. To create your own surface cleanser, combine eucalyptus with lemon and peppermint oils and water into a spray bottle to wipe down surfaces in your kitchen or bathroom.

Because eucalyptus oil might be toxic if taken internally in large amounts, it is recommended to use it carefully, avoiding the contact with eyes and keeping it out of the reach of children. Pregnant and breastfeeding women should avoid using Eucalyptus oil.

You can purchase high quality, therapeutic grade Eucalyptus oil here:

 

 

Disclaimer
The sole purpose of these articles is to provide information about the tradition of Ayurveda. This information is not intended for use in the diagnosis, treatment, cure or prevention of any disease.

 

Incorporating Essential Oils into Your Daily Yoga Practice

Using essential oils in your daily yoga practice can improve your practice, support the immune system, help you focus and lighten your mood. It is easy to simply add a few essential oils, and the impact is worth it and very enjoyable.  I suggest using DoTerra essential oils for their purity and effectiveness. Below are a few suggestions on how to incorporate the oils:

For a mood balancing practice, began with DoTerra's breath essential oil, this supports a connection and deepens your breathing. Place a drop or two in your palms and bring them in a tent to your face. Close your eyes and focus on your breathing. After breathing and grounding into your practices.

Next place a few drops of Peppermint oil at the top of the mat. Create a circle on your mat, repeating the circle a couple times. Peppermint oil works a lot like a mantra; it helps you focus and has calming properties. It is invigorating and supports intelligence through out your practice. Just before ending your practice, use Balance essential oils on the bottoms of your feet, and then relax into corpse pose.

If you need to make your practice quick, sun salutations are the way to go. With this start by sitting in lotus position at the top of your mat. Use one to two drops of peppermint oil in the palm of your hand, rub it together and breath in deeply, allow yourself to connect to your breath and clear your mind. Then apply the oil to your chest and over your lungs, this helps open the airways and prepare your body for effective oxygenation.

Once you are finished with this step use one drop of wild orange on your wrists and at the back of the neck. Inhale deeply and start your sun salutation practice. Once you are complete with the sun salutations, end your series by applying lavender oil at the bottom of your feet and resting in corpse pose.

Additional Tips:

Some people like to help the body detox during a yoga practice, if this is you, take two drops of Lemon essential oil in your water before and after your session to help flush toxins and cleanse the body.

For meditation, use Sandalwood and or Frankincense to balance the left and right hemisphere of the brain.

To clean your mat, use 4 oz of Water in a Glass Spray Bottle and add 10 drops of both Lavender and Melaleuca

 

Disclaimer
The sole purpose of these articles is to provide information about the tradition of Ayurveda. This information is not intended for use in the diagnosis, treatment, cure or prevention of any disease.

Essential Oils for Your Dosha

Essential oils are a wonderful way to balance the dosha on a daily basis. Understanding essential oils from an Ayurvedic prospective can help you customize your approach to essential oils. Ayurveda recognizes that because of their chemical makeup, all essential oils, will either add heat or will have a cooling effect on the body. Essential oils can be arranged in a vertical line, with the oils that are coolest at the top, the oils that are neutral in the middle , and the oils that are warming at the bottom. All essential oils can be placed somewhere on this line , according to their properties. For example blue chamomile is a cooling oil, lavender exemplifies neutrality, and thyme is a hot essential oil. 

Try taking a chamomile and peppermint bath and feel the coolness when you come out. Experience a drop of thyme or clove rubbed into the skin on the forearm. You should notice a warmth with in 15 min. The oils in the middle range, the neutral oils such as lavender as known as balancers, because if you are feverish, they can help cool you down, and if you are feeling very cold and you apply lavender in a massage oil base to the body, it can warm you up. Lavender is an oil for all seasons. Balancers will always bring you back toward neutral, toward normal function. 

Western chemistry can fit into this arrangement, with the essential oils at the top of chart being very electro-negative. They have extra electrons and take heat away from the body. Those essential oils at the bottom of the chart are elect o-positive. They are missing electrons in their outer rings, and are eager and ready to acquire them, producing heat in the body.

Ayurveda also recognizes that essential oils can be classified as wet or dry. The wet oils have hight polarity and mix well with water. If you put them into a bath they disperse into, and become a part of the water. Another name for this property is hydrophilic (water loving). Oils of low polarity don’t mix with water. They will float on the surface of the bather and form a “ring” on the edge of the tub. They have affinity and mix with vegetable oils and fats , these oils are called lipophilic (fat loving). All of the essential oils can be arranged on a line that runs from left (wet) to the right (dry). Some of the wet essential oils are geranium and rose, having high constituents levels of alcohol and some of the dry, fat loving oils are the terpenes, such as citrus oils and pine. Neutral oils again are oils such as lavender, clary sage Roman chamomile, basil, anise and tarragon.

Vata Balancing
Because Vata is light, dry, mobile and cold, it is treated with oils which are wet, heavy, calming and warming. Vata is reduced by the tastes sweet, sour, and salty, this can be used when determining the oil that is correct for Vata. When understanding Vata, there are two types of imbalances to consider. One is known as obstructed Vata where the channels of the body have become clogged with toxic residues (ama), the result of indigestion, poor diet, and poor elimination in the presence of dosha imbalance. Like Kapha excess, obstructed Vata is treated for a short period of time to remove the blockages. The other type is called Vata-caused deficiency, and this is where excess Vata in the system has caused drying, emaciation and loss of tissues. Vata-caused deficiency resembles the extreme aging process.

The following essential oils are good stimulates for both types of Vata, they increases digestive fire, flushes toxins, increases internal heat and strengthen circulation. They are contraindicated in very high Vata conditions such as dehydration or inflamed mucous membranes. Ginger, oregano, orange, eucalyptus, cumin, cinnamon, clove, celery seed, black pepper, bergamot, bay, calamus, camphor, marjoram, arnica, ajwan, caraway, thyme, sage, rosewood, lemon, nutmeg.

Vata-caused deficiency requires nutritive herbs that will build the tissues. These could relieve menstrual cramping, build the blood, moisten and nourish the sexual immune system, strengthen organ weakness due to disease and alleviate poor nutrition or aging. Angelica, clary sage, myrrh, parsley, tarragon, vanilla, rose and jasmine (but both are cooling so avoid prolonged use).

Pitta Balancing
Because Pitta is hot and wet, it is supported with cooling, heat dispelling drying, nutritive and calming oils. The tastes for reducing Pitta are sweet, astringent and bitter. Cooling carminatives are often aromatic spices that improve digestion and elimination by removing blockages and promoting flow of energy. These oils include chamomile, coriander, cumin, dill, fennel, lavender, lemon, lemon balm, lime, neroli, peppermint, spearmint, winter green.

Astringent oils reduce the excretions and discharges and are drying, yet prevent the loss of moisture and have a tightening effect on the tissues, promote wonder healing of the surface tissues and stop bleeding. Calendula, carrot seed, lemon, St. Johns wort, turmeric, wintergreen, yarrow.

Cooling alternatives that purify the blood, fight infections, reduce fevers and promote healing, includes herbs such as, aloevera, coriander, cumin, dill, jasmine, neem, sandalwood, spearmint, taggets, turmeric, yarrow, blue chamomile. Nutritive tonics nourish the tissues of the body, reduce inflammation, restore secretions, build the blood and lymph system. Angelica, carrot seed, cedar wood, neem, neroli, spikenard. Rejuvenates renew the body and mind, increases awareness, change patterns, and creates expansion. Angelica, brahmi, carrot seed, cedar wood, rose, jatamansi.


Cooling diuretics reduce Pitta’s heat and cool the liver. Coriander, fennel, lavender, lemongrass, sandalwood, spearmint. Antipyretics to reduce Pitta’s fire. Jasmine, lime, neem, tagetes, vetiver, neroli are all options.

Kapha Balancing
Kapha is water and earth, it is predominantly cold, moist, slow and heavy in nature. It can be supported with warming, drying, lightening and stimulating therapy. The tastes that improve or balance Kapha are pungent, bitter and astringent. Pungent is the most important because it is exactly opposite from Kapha, being light, hot and dry. Diuretics can be used to reduce water and are an important Kapha therapy. Oils of Ajwan, cinnamon, coriander, fennel, garlic, juniper berry, lemongrass, parsley, spearmint, are effective for this.

Increasing the digestive fire reduces Kapha, so all stimulant and carminative essential oils can be importance therapy, especially the heating carmitive and stimulants. Ajwan, anise, basil, bay, black pepper, calamus, cardamon, cayenne, cinnamon, cloves, garlic, ginger, juniper berry, mustard, nutmeg, orange peel, oregano, parsley, pennyroyal, safforn, thyme turmeric, valerian.

The main areas that hold Kapha in the forms of mucous are the lungs and stomach. Emetic therapy is important for expelling mucous buildups in the stomach and the lungs, but should be only administered by those who have training in Panchakarma. Diaphoretic oils can be helpful for eliminating water through seating. They cleanse the blood and lymphatics. Ajwan, angelica, basil, camphor, cardamom, cinnamon, cloves, eucalyptus, ginger, juniper berry, lemongrass, mugwort, oregano, sage, thyme.

 

 

Disclaimer
The sole purpose of these articles is to provide information about the tradition of Ayurveda. This information is not intended for use in the diagnosis, treatment, cure or prevention of any disease.

How and Why Essential Oils Affect the Body

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Essential oils are the aromatic, or volatile constituents found in plants. They contain the most active physiological plant properties. Some experts say they contain the life force of the plants. Chemically, essential oils are made up of alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, phenols, terpenes, sesquiterpenes, ethers and esters. 

The routes through which essential oils react with the body and its metabolism are called pathways. The most important pathway, in terms of its profound effect of the body, is through the sense of smell. When we smell essential oils, the vapor stimulates small hair-like extensions of our olfactory nerve. The olfactory nerve is the only nerve in the body that is directly contacts the external environment and goes all the way to the brain. All of our other senses (touch, hearing, sight, and taste) involves several nerves and synaptic junctions before the impulses reach the brain. The olfactory nerve stimulates the most primitive part of the brain know as the limbic system, also called the reptilian brain. This is important in the processing of the reaction to emotions, desires, appetites and memories. 

In the second phase, essential oils penetrate the epithelial tissues; these include the skin, nasal passages, bronchioles, lungs and gastro-intestinal tract. The essential oils will have a strong effect on these primary contact tissues and pathways. Once absorbed into the surface layer, essential oils quickly penetrate into the lymphatic and blood capillary systems, entering into the general circulation. This is also true for the other epithelial tissues of the body, including sinuses and lungs.

Once the essential oils in the lymph circulatory system it can be carried directly to the liver or fed into the blood stream. As the oil circulates within the blood, body tissues and organs the body may choose any portion of the essential oil that it wishes to utilize in its metabolic process, or simply receive the stimulation, sedation or beneficial property of the oil as it passes through.

The third state of pathways involves the elimination processes of the body. Some components of essential oils are picked up by the surface of the lungs and are out gassed as a vapor. As an example, Eucalyptol (an alcohol in eucalyptus oil) is transported to the lungs surfaces by the blood stream and calms the mucous membranes as it exits. Others, such as terpenes in juniper berry oil, are filtered out by the kidneys, and have stimulating effects on the renal tissue, ureters, bladder and urethra as they exit.  Some components of the essential oils are extracted by the liver, held briefly in the gall bladder, and dumped into the GI tract, having profound affects on these organ systems as they pass through. For example Rose oil can stimulate bile production as it is processed by the liver. Some constituents tend to migrate toward the skin, where they will exit via the sebaceous glands and become part of the protective acid mantle. Components of yarrow can increase perspiration as they are excreted. 

These direct connection in the pathways are why essential oils can have such a profound and immediate effects on very deep aspects of your being. Research indicates that very small, almost homeopathic qualities create this stimulation. Larger doses do not increase the response appreciably.